Mental Health and the effects it had during the pandemic

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/irish-journal-of-psychological-medicine/article/mental-health-and-the-covid19-pandemic/EBB86EFA79A742A09FBD71FEF134931F
It is assumed, based on extant data from previous pandemics, together with emerging data from this pandemic, that psychological morbidity will inevitability rise (Maunder et al. Reference Maunder, Leszcz, Savage, Adam, Peladeau, Romano, Rose and Schulman2008; The Academy of Medical Sciences, 2020). Furthermore, this morbidity may peak later and endure for longer than the physical health consequences of the pandemic (Gunnell et al. Reference Gunnell, Appleby, Arensman, Hawton, John, Kapur, Khan, O’Connor and Pirkis2020). This trend is seen in several perspective pieces in this edition where it is described that the early phases of the pandemic did not necessarily herald an increase in mental health presentations. It is clear, however, that adaptation to the new conditions imposed by COVID-19 has increased workloads on the frontline of mental health. Furthermore, the anticipated increase in mental illness, with potential also for increased suicidality, is deemed most likely in the mid- and post-pandemic phase, as economic contraction, constrained mental healthcare resources, individual vulnerabilities and the stark reality of dramatically altered lifestyles coalesce.
It is particularly important in this action-oriented phase of pandemic response that due care is given to ensuring that limited mental healthcare resources are utilised in an evidenced-based manner. There are dangers associated with rushing to implement novel psychological support innovations for pandemic-related stress if they are not robustly evaluated and economically viable in the longer term (The Lancet Psychiatry, 2020). In essence, this could potentially involve inappropriate redirection of our scant mental health resources. Against this backdrop, the pandemic should not be seen as merely a crisis to be endured, but also as a unique opportunity to progress targeted research and application of evidenced-based innovation. These sentiments are proposed in the collection of papers in this issue, with many examples and evaluations of service innovation as well as the progression of novel technologies such as providing remote consultation.
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0020764020925835
There was an observed neuropsychiatric linkage between SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and mental health problems with severe psychiatric comorbidities like depression, panic attacks, anxiety attacks, psychomotor excitement, suicidal deaths, delirium and psychotic symptoms (Xiang et al., 2020). Also the lives affected by COVID-19 are at further stake due to the perpetuated potential adverse effects. For instance, during travel restrictions and postponement and cancelation of religious, sports, cultural and entertainment events, people in quarantine may experience anger, loneliness, boredom and anxiety, and symptoms of cough, fever, myalgia and fatigue may cause emotional distress and feelings of fear of contracting COVID-19 (Xiang et al., 2020). While scientists, clinicians, local and international health organizations and authorities, epidemiologists and virologists are working on many unanswered questions of this novel outbreak, general public, global media and opinion-makers are responding to this uncertainty based on a limited confirmed/unconfirmed knowledge. This has further elevated the repercussions in the lives of people in the wake of COVID-19 and calls for the new database of research on psychological health.
Health organizations and health care professionals are focusing on controlling the COVID-19 pandemic by recommending self-isolation, social distancing and quarantine, with the slightest emphasis on the impact of psychological health (‘Coronavirus disease situation reports’, 2020). The emergence, prevalence and transmission of COVID-19 are beyond physical health, and emotional distress, anxiety, fear, depression, suicidality, public stigma, discrimination, racism, xenophobia, posttraumatic symptoms and sleep disturbance are some of the consequences on psychological health. The physical counteractive measures toward managing COVID-19 include early identification and separation of suspected cases, biological and clinical data collection, consensus of expert medical interventions, establishment of quarantine units and strengthening of medical staff in the affected regions (Ford-Jones & Chaufen, 2017; ‘Report of the WHO’, 2020; Severance et al., 2011).
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/07067437211027979
This is in keeping with findings that the pandemic, contributed to 40% of the U.S. general adult population struggling with depressive/anxiety symptoms compared to 10% pre-pandemic2 During the pandemic, substance abuse was seen in 12% of the U.S. adult population and 15% of high school students.2 Pediatric mental health visits to the emergency department in the United States increased by over 40% in March to October 2020.3
youth have higher rates of anxiety and substance abuse compared to older generations as the pandemic is a macro-example of multiple Adverse Childhood Experiences clustered in time. The pandemic’s economic disruptions have affected adult employment, mental health, and intrafamily violence while school disruptions have impacted school-based nutrition and mental health services, education, peer supports, and the support of staff who are mandated reporters for maltreatment. This may explain some of the generational differences in mental health described in the study.
There was an observed neuropsychiatric linkage between SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and mental health problems with severe psychiatric comorbidities like depression, panic attacks, anxiety attacks, psychomotor excitement, suicidal deaths, delirium and psychotic symptoms (Xiang et al., 2020). Also the lives affected by COVID-19 are at further stake due to the perpetuated potential adverse effects. For instance, during travel restrictions and postponement and cancelation of religious, sports, cultural and entertainment events, people in quarantine may experience anger, loneliness, boredom and anxiety, and symptoms of cough, fever, myalgia and fatigue may cause emotional distress and feelings of fear of contracting COVID-19 (Xiang et al., 2020). While scientists, clinicians, local and international health organizations and authorities, epidemiologists and virologists are working on many unanswered questions of this novel outbreak, general public, global media and opinion-makers are responding to this uncertainty based on a limited confirmed/unconfirmed knowledge. This has further elevated the repercussions in the lives of people in the wake of COVID-19 and calls for the new database of research on psychological health.
Health organizations and health care professionals are focusing on controlling the COVID-19 pandemic by recommending self-isolation, social distancing and quarantine, with the slightest emphasis on the impact of psychological health (‘Coronavirus disease situation reports’, 2020). The emergence, prevalence and transmission of COVID-19 are beyond physical health, and emotional distress, anxiety, fear, depression, suicidality, public stigma, discrimination, racism, xenophobia, posttraumatic symptoms and sleep disturbance are some of the consequences on psychological health. Ford-Jones & Chaufen, 2017; Severance et al., 2011) have recommended that physical measures be taken in addition to early diagnosis, isolation, collection of biological data, and setting up quarantine units to combat COVID-19.

The Implications of COVID-19 for Mental Health and Substance Use


The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic recession have negatively affected many people’s mental health and created new barriers for people already suffering from mental illness and substance use disorders. During the pandemic, about 4 in 10 adults in the U.S. have reported symptoms of anxiety or depressive disorder, a share that has been largely consistent, up from one in ten adults who reported these symptoms from January to June 2019 (Figure 1). A KFF Health Tracking Poll from July 2020 also found that many adults are reporting specific negative impacts on their mental health and well-being, such as difficulty sleeping (36%) or eating (32%), increases in alcohol consumption or substance use (12%), and worsening chronic conditions (12%), due to worry and stress over the coronavirus. As the pandemic wears on, ongoing and necessary public health measures expose many people to experiencing situations linked to poor mental health outcomes, such as isolation and job loss.
• Young adults have experienced a number of pandemic-related consequences, such as closures of universities and loss of income, that may contribute to poor mental health. During the pandemic, a larger than average share of young adults (ages 18-24) report symptoms of anxiety and/or depressive disorder (56%). Compared to all adults, young adults are more likely to report substance use (25% vs. 13%) and suicidal thoughts (26% vs. 11%). Prior to the pandemic, young adults were already at high risk of poor mental health and substance use disorder, though many did not receive treatment.

• The pandemic has disproportionately affected the health of communities of color. Non-Hispanic Black adults (48%) and Hispanic or Latino adults (46%) are more likely to report symptoms of anxiety and/or depressive disorder than Non-Hispanic White adults (41%). Historically, these communities of color have faced challenges accessing mental health care.
• During the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns about mental health and substance use have grown, including concerns about suicidal ideation. In January 2021, 41% of adults reported symptoms of anxiety and/or depressive disorder (Figure 2), a share that has been largely stable since spring 2020. In a survey from June 2020, 13% of adults reported new or increased substance use due to coronavirus-related stress, and 11% of adults reported thoughts of suicide in the past 30 days. Suicide rates have long been on the rise and may worsen due to the pandemic. Early 2020 data show that drug overdose deaths were particularly pronounced from March to May 2020, coinciding with the start of pandemic-related lockdowns.

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more